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Lung Cancer


Read actual excerpts from closing argument by a nicotine attorney in a lung cancer case.

(C125)

How many tears will a child cry                                  

When they're told their dad will die

When their dad goes into eternity

For the cancer the doctor did not see

The emotions which are torn apart

And all the pain on the families heart

A precious life just slipping away

How can one be happy and gay

Knowing there's nothing one can do

Feelings of sorrow, feelings so blue

For now they'll cherish every living day

Tell him all the things they need to say

Truly a dad who really loved and cared

A lifelong memory forever shared.

Angela B. - daughter of victim who is in last stages of terminal lung cancer.

(C2004)

My brothers, sisters and I buried my father on St Patrick's Day. We lost him to Lung cancer. He was 73 and very active until the cancer. He was playing volleyball 2 years ago with men in the 30-40's. He was diagnosed in June. It was a shock because he had not smoked in about 20-25years. But he lived with my mom who was a heavy smoker and she died of lung cancer in 1990. So actually her smoking killed my father also.

This disease has devisted my family. We are all educated, family oriented people. I keep thinking there must be something that can me done. I am 32 years old and I have no parents because of smoking. MF

(C126)

I lost my father to a heart attack caused by smoking (age 69), and  my
mother at age 53 to  due to a lung aneurism caused by smoking. She went
back to smoking after abstaining for 2 years after the lung surgery that
removed her entire left lung and part of her right lung. She had a
tracheotomy in order to breath. I had to suction copious amounts of goop
out of her lungs several times a day. As a teenager I found out that a
smoker can get their fix through the trach tube, and I was furious she
would continue to smoke knowing this would leave her children orphans.

My  brother married later in life and adopted 13 children. He died at
43 from lung cancer that metastasized to his stomach ( a 3 pack a day
smoker, first cigarette at age 12). His wife died at age 40 a year later
from lung cancer (2 pack a day smoker). My father-in-law and his wife
both died from cancer of the brain that began in their lungs. It was a
very painful thing for them to endure. Since she worked for a cigarette
manufacturer, getting cigarettes was easy and packs were available free
if they wanted them, and they did want them. DJH

(C143)

My brother has just died of lung cancer. He was only 54, and yes, he was a smoker. He has died a month after being diagnosed with cancer. We are devastated and terribly angry. When he was very young, working in a factory in Milan, Italy, he started to smoke because he was lonely, the job was alienating and repetitive, but nobody and I mean, nobody ever told him of the danger of smoking.. Warnings on cigarettes packets were introduced only very recently, certainly I am right in thinking that he has been killed...
Please help me in finding someone to blame, or at least in doing something to stop other young people from dying of nicotine poisoning. Do we only care to make huge profits? Does a life mean nothing to those who kill people by selling them cigarettes?
Regards
Maria

(C102)Dear NV,

In April of last year my mother passed away of lung cancer caused by her addiction to cigarettes. My father has just recently lost 3 toes to Buerger's Disease, caused by nicotine. My father has since quit smoking but he will go on the rest of his life with a limp and these are not the first digits he has lost to an addiction he just couldn't kick.

In '85 and in '90 he lost the tips of a total of three fingers. My mother smoked right up until the day she died. No matter how hard she tried she could not put down her lifeline, which is what the cigarettes became until she finally lost her life. Now my brother and I have watched these two people that we love dearly go through these tragedies with no way to help.

We are now trying to put ourselves through college because the medical bills are so high that Daddy can barely make the payments no matter how hard he tries. He loves us dearly but there is just so much he can do. I am just wondering if there is anything we could do. Had Mama lived and worked until retirement then maybe we wouldn't be as stretched as we are now. I know this explanation is probably too long and for that I apologize. Thank you for your time.
Sincerely,K. P.

(C108)
I live in the State of New York. My father died of lung cancer in March. Unfortunately, he died a very debilitating death and gasped for air in the last months of his life. The doctors told us that anyone could get lung cancer, but the type of lung cancer that my father had could only be contracted by a smoker. My father smoked for almost 40 years but had quit in the last years of his life. Once again, thank you. R. B.

(C121)Hello,

I am a thirty-year-old woman who had smoked for 15 years and surrendered March 31, 1998. I was told that I have cervical dysphasia, which could very well lead to cancer. I had a biopsy and am to return to the doctor in September for another Pap Smear and possible biopsy to decide whether or not they want to do surgery.

I didn't think at the age of fifteen that smoking was a bad thing. I thought it was cool, it made me appear grown up. I quickly became addicted to them without even realizing it. I am trying to explain addiction to my stepson who at the age of twelve is now smoking. I told him to hold his breath for as long as he can, which he did and then he said, "I need to breathe". That is what addiction is like, you need to smoke. Your body craves it, your mind makes you think you will die without one when the truth is... you will die with them.

If you are a smoker, there is a time when it is too late, please break through your denial that cigarettes won't kill you and find a way that works for you to let them go. It is possible. You weren't born a smoker, you don't have to die one. J. S.

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